urban survival kit survival ya books

Picture the scene, you’re stranded in the wild, running out of water and food, and you come across a river you need to pass. A big river. A fast river. Fear not. There may not be an app for that, but there is a Bear Grylls survival tip.

An idea on one area that I seem to run into a lot of contention from some people with: electronics. If you’re bugged in and can power them, good for you. If you’re mobile, ditch ’em (most of them). Batteries seem lightweight, but that two pounds of batteries become 40 pounds after 20 miles. Anything that can’t be charged or operated on solar or hand cranks, in my opinion, has no place in a back pack. And of the things that can, many are simply unnecessary. Chromebook for maps, manuals and documents? Get a good smart phone with high capacity storage or OTG storage capabilities with multiple flash drives. Half the weight, just as versatile, twice as mobile. Not to mention, easier to pack.

Thank you for this, it’s great. We’re going to be putting together a first aid/medical kit list sometime in the future, and I’ll definitely take that first list into account when we get around to posting that. It’ll be really helpful.

A signal mirror is one of the furthest-reaching non-electronic signal methods. Properly aimed, a signal mirror is capable of shining a beam of daylight up to 10 miles away to create a flash of light that can catch the attention of distant aircraft, watercraft, vehicles, or someone on foot.

Acorns and oak bark have excellent medicinal properties to heal gastrointestinal problems. If you can find some acorns and oak bark, just boil it in water for 5 minutes and drink the concoction. It will help you fight diarrhea and other gastro-intestinal issues.

Why would carry gold? I can understand the importance of silver because it it $20 an ingot and can be used for trade and barter. Gold is a whopping $1,250 a coin, and no one in a SHTF crisis is going to have change for a purchase.

I’ve had unbearable physical and emotional pain in my life. I lived through a life threatening illness, was bullied as a child, survived divorce and great financial problems. I worked hard to change things and find a solution. I knew things would work out because whenever I took action to get relief something good always came out of it.

A properly packed backpack is requisite to your comfort and safety. Incorrect weight distribution leads to muscle aches and unnecessary strain on your spine. Place heavy items – water, food, and cooking gear – in the middle of your pack, close to your body. Use medium weight items – clothing, tarps, and rain gear – to cushion the heavier items, securing them, so the weight does not shift while you are hiking. Pack your sleeping bag in the bottom of your backpack or tie to the bottom. Store items that you are likely to need more frequently in the side and outer pockets – compass and map, sunglasses, toilet tissue and trowel, sunscreen, bug repellent, pocketknife, flashlight, snacks, and a small towel.

If you come across a fast-moving stream, it is better not to try crossing it. You may think that you can manage the flow of the current, but there is no accurate measure of the speed. You can be quickly swept away by a seemingly manageable current.

GA Mom….You said “make sure you have a good seal”….I assume that you’re talking bout the mylar bag prior to sealing the lid ? And you recommend waiting and checking the bag after a day before putting on the lid?

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