survival skills classes survival 5

We’ve thought about doing a bug out bag guide so many times before it’d be impossible to count, but somehow in 4 years, still haven’t actually published one. The why comes down to the fact that, unlike comprehensive lists – like of all…

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It’s about creating a site that keeps people engaged, gets them clicking and lowers bounce rate and if you read about SurvivalLife over on DigitalMarketer.com you’ll see them talk about how they initally went with a really clean design similar to Uncrate.com but their bounce rate was terrible so they made the site really messy and ugly and bounce rate dropped dramatically.

Well, folks, here we are again, another week of prepping and another week closer to TEOTWAWKI. But, before, we get started with this weeks what did you do to prep this week I’d like to point you to … Continue Reading about What did you do to prep this week?

This is a sample outbreak journal: the author notes covered-up zombie outbreaks seen on the local news as well as the preparations he recommends in the event that the outbreak worsens. The following pages are blank entries, for the reader to use as a basis for his or her own notes on surviving zombies.

Try getting Gamma lids. These make a great seal. They are not cheap….but I’ve had mine for years. Don’t stack them on top of each other without plywood or heavy cardboard between levels. Available on emergency Essentials and sometimes at your loocal Wally World.

by John B I made this 10’ wide X 10’ X 5’ tall Chicken run for under 100 bucks and it has worked fantastically. What you will need 1” elbows 20 1“ T’s – 14 1” PVC pipe 12 – 10’ … Continue Reading about How to Make a Secure Chicken Run for Backyard Chickens Out of PVC, Chicken Wire, and Zip Ties

After a rainfall, you can bet that moss, leaves, and all sorts of plants around you are wet. Collecting bundles of them and wringing them over a container can net you as much as a litre of water. Make sure you check out the tall grass as well. This is good for collecting fresh water because rainwater is guaranteed to be clean. This is also one of the easiest ways to collect water without having to purify it. Alternatively, you can also rub your clothes against the grass and wring out the moisture that gets stuck unto them.

Thank you for this, it’s great. We’re going to be putting together a first aid/medical kit list sometime in the future, and I’ll definitely take that first list into account when we get around to posting that. It’ll be really helpful.

Disclaimer: Just in case it’s not obvious I’m not claiming that if you copy this model or create a similar site you’ll make a million dollars a month. You might make $0. It just an example of what is possible. 

• Let the air flow: The purpose of this shelter is to create shade. Use available material such as bark, leaves, a poncho, an emergency sleeping bag or blanket or any available fabric to cover one side.

Photo by Steven DepoloBandanas take up little or no space, have multiple uses, and can even be worn as jewelry. As a medical supply, use it as a tourniquet, wound dressing, smoke mask, or sling. Use bandanas to wrap around and protect delicate items such as electronics and sunglasses. Use one to wash with or to wash dishes with, to pre-filter water or as a napkin. Protect your head from the sun, make a sweatband, or tie back your hair. If you become lost or disoriented, a brightly colored bandana makes an easy-to-spot signal flag; tear strips to mark your trail.

This was the first survival kit that I’ve bought, so I can’t compare it to others on the market, but it seems to be a well-put-together survival kit. The plastic compartment is made of durable material, although, I wouldn’t count on it being watertight. The rubber gasket on the lid doesn’t seem to seal against the base well enough to make it fully waterproof. Inside, it holds just about everything needed to survive a couple nights out in the woods if you get stranded or lost. With much success, I lit a fire with the sparker and tinder-quik cotton fire starters on the first spark! The knife is really neat; it has a built in high-intensity LED light, with a switch, pointed in the direction of the knife blade to help you see as you are cutting or carving at night, and it has an integrated whistle on the rear to alert a near-by rescuer of your approximate position. In the bottom portion of the container, there’s fishing tackle, small diameter cord, and steel line that can be used for fishing, traps, snares, and shelters. The top portion contains literature on wilderness survival techniques, a large signal mirror, and how-to guide for the kit. I use the signal mirror to see when I’m putting my contacts in my eyes and to put on camoflauge face paint for hunting. This is a great compact survival kit for any backpacker!

Don’t worry. As long as you know what time it is, you can still tell where north is. Simply draw an analog representation of the time on the ground and draw the lines from there. Cellphones are particularly useful in telling the actual time regardless where you are because mobile tech nowadays uses GPS to be able to tell the time of the day regardless of location. Of course, it’s always advised that a survivalist have a watch with them at all times.

Tampons are almost as useful for surviving in the wild as condoms—and as weird as that sounds, it’s not even a little bit sarcastic. A tampon has four basic parts: a plastic tube, cotton wadding, string, and an airtight wrapper. For a quick DIY fishing bobber, open the wrapper at one end, take the tampon out, then tie the wrapper closed with a bubble of air inside.

As a father of 3 small children, I have always tried to protect and provide for all their immediate and future necessities.  I could not come home and tell my kids there was no food on the shelves.  Now, I can sleep in peace having purchased years of emergency food! I love having the peace of mind, the feeling of being empowered– that my family and I are covered with the necessary emergency food, and survival supplies for the next 20 years at TODAY’S prices for what ever comes our way. For more information, go to blog .  http://survivalist-hub.blogspot.com/. 

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