survival bars survival apex gloves

Here for the first time and am glad I came. I have designed and built my own off grid home and existence in southern Colorado (solar powered) but have yet to create my own food supply (aquaponic) in the future or survival preparation to the extent I hope to in the near future. Thanks so much for all the site info and looking forward to your eBook and newsletter.

The NiteCore P12 and the Fenix PD35 flashlights both use CR123 batteries. I haven’t found those batteries in any Big Box store or in any kind of rechargeable version. Would we be safer with equipment that uses rechargeable AA’s? All of my solar rechargers are configured for AAA, AA, C, D, and 9V batteries. I can’t recharge CR123’s.

FireLaces are one of those pieces of gear you can wear every day. These are shoelaces with mini Ferro rods at the ends. Just loop the striker into the laces, and you’re shoes become a survival tool in their own right.

4. Folding knife: The TecX Inceptra Fold-Up Knife ($24.99) is secure and sharp. This inexpensive fold-up knife is lightweight and conveniently folds for safety. Also, it easily shaves wood for kindling or serves as spear point.

Ah – I must’ve missed that part, my apologies. 1 million in SALES is definitely viable, if they are selling/promoting expensive products. Though still to my point, if you are using this website as a proof of concept for your marketing business – as they are – they should be transparent and disclose what operating costs were.

Laser pointer for signaling aircraft (red is color of distress, but green color is higher power and will be seen farther), with lithium cells, in double waterproof plastic pouch (pointers of high power are a theoretical hazard to eyes of low-flying pilots at night)

If you’re suffering from hypothermia, bubble wrap can save your life. Who would have guessed? Apparently, the air bubbles in the packing material create an insulating shield that bounces back body heat to keep a person warm. In one study, it was found that a sheet of bubble wrap was about seventy percent as effective as three cotton blankets for insulating a person—and since it’s made out of plastic, it was even more effective in the wind and rain.

Hold your watch horizontally and point it so that the hour hand is facing into the sun. At the center point between the 12 and the hour hand is your north/south line, with north facing away from the sun. So if the hour hand is pointing at 4, for example, the 2 would point towards the south and the 8 would point towards the north.

If you find yourself in a survival type situation, you most certainly won’t have the utensils to cook your food. In that case, you may have to improvise to make your own. One of the best ways to cook in the wild is to grill. You can design a make-shift grill using metal rods or picks that you can find in your tent or backpacks.

Africa Studio/ShutterstockGrab an ice cube. If you rub an ice cube on the spot between your thumb and index finger, it sends cold signals to your brain, which in turn can tamp down the pain signals coming from your tooth. In one study, people who did this reduced their pain levels by 50 percent compared to people who rubbed the spot with no ice. You can also try one of these toothache remedies.

• Digging for water: Certain plants indicate water sources are nearby. Identify plants, such as cattails, cottonwood or willows, and dig a seep hole until you reach moisture. Wait for water to collect in the hole.

Dehydration is no joke. Whether hiking the Grand Canyon or spending another day at the office, staying hydrated is essential to health. The human body is at least two-thirds water, and once its liquid content is reduced, bad things start to happen. Let’s review mild to serious effects of dehydration to help your water intake efforts.

If you’re putting together a solid first aid kit, you have to decide if that kit is going to have to perform in long-term survival settings. You can put together a decent kit or even consider one of our specially-designed kits, but what if a disast…

In this list I share the top 10 most influential survival and preparedness blogs. Although this may be my list, I did not pick these randomly. I used a number of factors in determining their “influence”: Google PageRank, number of incoming links, traffic, blog comments/discussions, and Alexa Rank as well as “that special something” (very scientific, I know).

If you’re in a cold climate and are doing your best to prepare power outages that may happen in the winter, take a read through our guide to staying warm indoors during a power outage when it’s freezing cold outside.

Housing prices in the United States continue to rise at unprecedented rates forcing many into poverty.  This worsening epidemic is explained well in a video by The Money GPS and it’s been engineered this way.

But to quote the wise men who have walked this fair earth in ages past, questionable advice is technically better than no advice—so here are ten unusual survival tips that could end up saving your life. And as a disclaimer, don’t actually try number three.

Find water: As the subjects of my stories know too well, you can last only about four days without water. To ward off dehydration, search for animals, birds (especially songbirds), insects (especially honeybees), and green vegetation, all of which can indicate that water is nearby. Rock crevices may also hold small caches of rainwater.

Sleeping on the ground will cause you to lose body heat faster, making it more likely for you to get cold. Sleeping on a poncho or a really thin blanket isn’t going to help this either. The best way to do this is to stack up leaves or logs to make a padded bed. Alternatively, you can bring a hammock with you and just set it up when you sleep.

A signal mirror can serve two vital survival purposes. First, a mirror can signal help to a rescue plan or helicopter. Using the power of the sun to shine a glare towards a rescue team is an excellent way to gain attention.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *