survival skills survival gear shopping

Assuming that you have already begun a fire successfully, the next step is to let the potential rescuers know your position. If the woods are thick, it can become impossible to see through the canopy even if the search party is looking for you from a helicopter. To let them know where you are, you need some signal.

Keep a pocket knife, or multi-tool with you at all times, because you never know when you will need it- and when you do need it, you will rejoice that you have something to cut, protect and prepare food- even if all you have is a crappy, little knife. Now just learn how to sharpen it like MacGuyver.

I was hoping to gain some kind of mentorship type relationship and the fact that you guys have the FB page and built this community was completely worth attending, just on it’s own. Just so after we leave the workshop, it’s not like we’re on an island all by ourselves.

I recommend you to check out our site at https://SurvivalWristbands.com – We have a great selection of survival bracelets and survival kits that include several essential for any survival scenario. Our Ultimate Survival Wristband includes a compass, whistle, fire rod, flint striker, tinder, alcohol pad, safety pins, fishing hooks, weights line and more all from the convenience of your wrist!

One such person said that the purpose of life was ‘to love and be loved’. At first I thought it to be naive and stupid and did not even give it a second thought. Then I wondered about why an educated person would put forward such a simplistic and spiritually motivated reason among a  set of extremely logical and convincing reasons given by others. It was then I started thinking about this seemingly illogical purpose of life.

While I haven’t been prepping for very long in comparison to most of you, I’d like to think I’ve learned quite a lot over the years through mistakes I’ve made with prepping. Honestly, mistakes make some of the most valuable lessons reso…

Fernando “Ferfal” Aguirre is unique in the sense that he has lived it (and is still living it). Easily pulling in our number 8 spot, Surviving in Argentina is about one man’s experience in a post economic-collapsed country and how he has had to adapt to the challenges and changes that came about. His insights provide a great model whereby many North Americans (and Europeans) can prepare for an impending economic collapse on their own soil.

Surviving in the wild — no matter the location or the time of year — depends more on human wit than the gear you have in your pack. But all survival experts still recommend assembling an emergency kit of equipment to stay with you at all times in the wilderness.

His novels tend to be heavy on acronyms and technical jargon,[31] while his non-fiction books concentrate on practical skills and tools. In the Acknowledgments note to his book Tools For Survival, Rawles credits David Brin, Algis Budrys, Tom Clancy, Bruce D. Clayton, Colonel Jeff Cooper, Frederick Forsyth, Pat Frank, Gordon Dickson, Friedrich Hayek, Henry Hazlitt, Ernest Hemingway, Dean Ing, Elmer Keith, Herbert W. McBride, Ludwig von Mises, Dr. Gary North, Arthur W. Pink, John Piper, Jerry Pournelle, Ayn Rand, Lew Rockwell, Murray Rothbard, George R. Stewart and Mel Tappan as influential to his writing.[32] In his blog, Rawles also cites Robert A. Heinlein as an influence, and often quotes him.[33]

LED lanterns and headlamps (yes, the dorky ones) are both a better, user friendly source for task lighting. Just try chopping that onion while holding a flashlight. No suggestions here but there are entire websites dedicated to each. Don’t go crazy on $$, this stuff is all made in the same place, probably by the same people. I have Streamlight, Ray-o-Vac and 30-Day currently on my shelf and I swear the parts are interchangeable.

I’m always on a tight budget, so yes, much of my kit is recycled or repurposed. Always remember, you don’t have to go out and buy everything. Adapt, improvise, and overcome. The most beautiful trout I ever caught was caught on a fresh cut bit of bamboo about 4 feet long, dental floss, and improvised wooden fish hook with a beetle tied to it as bait. That beetle put up one hell of a fight. Dental floss is an excellent investment for bugging in or out. Besides the obvious use of dental hygeine, it’s very tough, cheap, compact and lightweight in it’s own little super convenient package, and can be used in any application where a bit of string would serve better than 550 cord/paracord. Can even be used to close wounds in a pinch, multiple strands can be braided together for applications requiring more tensile strength when 550 cord is unavailable, and can be woven into a net. I used some braided strands in Afghanistan as an improvised bootlace to serve my needs until I got back to my patrol base where my spare laces were stowed.

Redundancy in the wilderness is your friends: always have extra knives, compasses, water gathering tools, and fire starting tools. Remember, surviving is all about making sure you have secured basic necessities to cook, stay warm, and self-defend. 

Aside from the fact that they can help keep you warm, socks are really good for a lot of things, such as filtering water and suspending small objects off branches. Wearing socks when you’re in the wilderness will also keep you from getting blisters, which is likely to happen when you’re walking around and exploring the wilderness all day. Plus, these are pieces of warm clothing that are very easy to dry out in case they get wet. For maximum foot protection on the trails and in the wilderness, it’s worth the investment to own a pair of durable leather combat boots that are both comfortable and rugged. The hard sole and ankle protection provide additional security when you step into diverse terrain.  

Wilderness survival sometimes calls for being found — that includes in a time of collapse as well. Perhaps you’ve put together a camp in a remote location. Whatever circumstances take place where you’re now cooperating with other people for survival, tasks related to hunting, scouting, and scavenging can mean you have to split off from the group at times.

NOTE — A micro torch relies on fuel; when your fuel runs out, you have no more flame. You need back-up fuel (butane in this case) if you want several month’s use in an extended survival situation. One thing to note: A canister of butane is cheap and just one can go a long ways and is also easy to use). Consider both back-up butane and even a back up torch in case of rare equipment failure (or to even use as a bartering item; there’s a good chance someone else is going to want one after they see how easy it is to start a fire).

When it comes to gear, I feel I have settled into a groove. I rarely experiment with tobacco these days (same with the pipes) and just stick to what I know I like. Hope you had a merry Christmas, and we’ll see you in the new year! Everyday Carry Item Breakdown …

A record number of firearms enthusiasts made their way to the Florida State Fairgrounds this weekend to attend the Florida Gun Show, amid a fierce national debate over gun rights following the Valentine’s Day massacre at Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida.

Is there some type of assistance to help people or does that not exist and equate these sites to the banking industry as they gave people promise of loans and tricky Mtgs that vanished as fast as their jobs. Basically- if you don’t have $ then you to shall perish ? Its not to far from the truth for many people in todays USA and other countries. Just looking for some hope along with the knowledge these sites give. Thank you, one american for many

Find or create shelter. Without adequate shelter, you will be fully exposed to the elements and will risk hypothermia or heatstroke, depending on the weather. If you are not properly dressed for the conditions, finding shelter is all the more important. Luckily, the woods are filled with tools and resources to make both shelters and fires (for warmth, safety, and signaling purposes). Here are some things you can use:

DISCLAIMER: the tips provided in this list does not guarantee survival. We are providing insights based on our own knowledge and experience. We simply sharing our personal ideas  and opinions with our audience. Use the outlined advice at your own risk. 

Imagine the ground under you is moving and you’re in the middle of an earthquake. It’s pretty scary, isn’t it? Unfortunately, it’s not exactly possible to predict earthquakes, though they can be anticipated. The natural disasters mainly occur near edges of tectonic plates (hello, California); however, they can occur anywhere. Learning what to do in the event of a major earthquake is an essential survival skill to have, and one that allows you to walk away wi… Continue Reading →

Just read ITEOTWAWKI- full of great information, concise and easy to follow. Made me feel better about some of my preps, makes me realize I am soooo far behind on others. But at least I am trying and making progress.

Previously here on NicheHacks.com I had a much nicer looking layout on the home page but bounce rate was high so I added double column posts and bounce rate dropped significantly. It doesn’t look as nice but that’s not what is important.

They obviously sell things they don’t even have in stock, or maybe that how they buy their stock; you buy from them and then they order from someone else? That would explain a lot of this crap, but someone needs to be held accountable for this. It shouldn’t be a hit or miss on getting an item you have already paid for in a reasonable amount of time. Three weeks should be the latest you get anything through the mail, and that’s if it is shipped from China, not 3 states over. It’s a 12-hour drive from my home in Alabama to Austin, Texas. I know for a fact because I used to make that drive when I was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas and had to drive through Austin, which was about 45 minutes away to get there.

Throughout our lives we use acronyms to learn and remember a variety of things. From NASA to AWOL to SEALs, we certainly do love our acronyms. When it comes to survival there’s a wealth of acronyms to help you be as prepared as possible. Take, for example, PACE. Typically pace is a word that’s more at home in the realm of car racing or running, but in the survival world, PACE is a way of making sure you’re ready for whatever the world has to throw at you. This can be a bug-out plan, a get-home plan, or a home-defense plan. Whatever type of prepping or survival plan you’re thinking o… Continue Reading →

When it comes to items necessary for a prepper to include in his or her planning, lip balm isn’t typically one that comes to mind. Chapped lips are bad, but when you’re talking about surviving a major disaster, it’s an ailment most people could deal with.

You can buy CR-123s by the hundred for about $20.00 on Amazon or Ebay. But unless space and weight are primary concerns, you’d be best off with rechargeable lithium AA/AAA batteries that can be set up to a solar charger. Ebay sells some batteries with built in USB ports although ports are notoriously fragile on phones so keep that in mind. The justification for going with lithium despite the higher price compared to NiMH isn’t more “power” but rather the longer shelf-life. NiMH lose charge at a rate of something like 50% over six months vs 10% or less per month for Lithium.

A survival kit is a package of basic tools and supplies prepared in advance as an aid to survival in an emergency. Civil and military aircraft, lifeboats, and spacecraft are equipped with survival kits.

I love these things. This WetFire product is very lightweight, easy to ignite, and it has a long burn time. Each cube weighs just .16 ounces and is capable of burning up to 10 minutes at temperatures around 1,300°F. They work in wet and windy conditions with ease. They even float and keep burning, even while floating in water. I’ve been bringing these little waxy cubes out for show-and-tell during survival classes for several years, and I’ve always observed impressive results in the field, regardless of the weather. In my most recent tests, a cube burned for 9.5 minutes on a very damp day—twice the burn time of the homemade alternative (Vaseline-soaked cotton balls). The flame was also much taller than the petroleum jelly on a cotton ball. Several spikes from the WetFire cube were 9 or 10 inches tall, which is twice the height of the flame from a greasy cotton ball.

I have to admit it, I LOVE wilderness survival. I first began learning wilderness survival out of a deep, primal need to feel in my bones that I could provide for my most basic human needs directly from nature. It seemed crazy to me that my life was totally dependent on a complex system of grocery stores, polluted highways, telecommunication systems, electric grids, modern structures, water treatment plants, and more. I mean, shouldn’t we all be able to be in direct relationship with our most primary needs? Perhaps idealistic, but that is what inspired me to begin my journey to become a wilderness survival guide over a decade ago.

• Double half hitch: Used to attach one end of a rope around an object. This is a useful knot for building a shelter. Tie a half hitch around your object, like a tree or pole, and follow it by a second in the same direction to make it a double. Pull tight to make secure.

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