survival checklist wilderness survival checklist

In my version of BACK-UP power there are no sacred Cows. Of import is, where your power system will be used/installed. In the City, or suburbs these would require permits and skilled/knowledgable installers. While a system in a Farming Ranching setting might require other priorities. And lastly a remote installation. (Getting the stuff to the site might be difficult). Weight these criteria for each situation. Do not let someone talk you into a ONE-SIZE-FITS ALL.

Disclaimer: Just in case it’s not obvious I’m not claiming that if you copy this model or create a similar site you’ll make a million dollars a month. You might make $0. It just an example of what is possible. 

Finding yourself in a survival situation can be extremely unsettling. I mean not like you practice getting in such cases every day, right? Most people can get very nervous and panic in situations like these. This outdoor survival skill can alone save your life in many situations.

Speaking of hairbands. I sometimes found myself in need of rubber bands while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. It’s amazing how and when the need for such a trivial little thing can arise. And I discovered hairbands are tougher. Paperclips are also in my BOB. Never know when you may need a short bit of light duty wire to use as an improvised needle or fish hook, light duty clamp, or twist ties. Small, compact, and lightweight. I have two cellophane wrappers from cigarette packs, one holds a small assortment of different sized hairbands, the other has an assortment of different sized paperclips. Both of them together weigh about 3 ounces and take up less space than just one of the cigarette packs that yielded the wrappers.

Most of us have heard of vital signs or checking vitals at one point or another, and these are the go-to indicators that are used to assess basic functions of the body that are essential for our survival.  They cover heart rate, blood pressure, respiration and temperature, and they normally fall within a specific range …

This lovely tale comes from our very own island of Britain. Bear needed to swim to the mainland after finding himself stranded on an island. He had to swim, but in those freezing waters, quite possibly wouldn’t have made it the short distance.

The “important” people who live on the east and west coasts of the USA like to refer to the rest of the country as “flyover country”, because the only time they see it is when they fly over it while traveling from one coast to the other. That…

Survival skills are techniques a person may use in a dangerous situation (e.g. natural disasters) to save themselves or others (see also bushcraft). Generally speaking, these techniques are meant to provide the basic necessities for human life: water, food, shelter, habitat, and the need to think straight, to signal for help, to navigate safely, to avoid unpleasant interactions with animals and plants, and for first aid. In addition, survival skills are often basic ideas and abilities that ancient humans had to use for thousands of years, so these skills are partially a reenactment of history. Many of these skills are the ways to enjoy extended periods of time in remote places, or a way to thrive in nature. Some people use these skills to better appreciate nature and for recreation, not just survival.

Following a collapse, expect a lot of people in outlying towns to significantly increase the hunting pressure in adjacent wilderness areas within the first few days. That means much of the local wildlife is likely to flee for more remote areas due to this sudden increase in hunting pressure. Study your maps and consider starting your wilderness journey in a remote area less likely to have any human activity — which means you may have to go several more miles than you may have initially considered. But the payoff for traveling a few extra miles to start your push into the wilderness will likely be worth it — hunting is likely to be best in remote areas with little or no human activity.

See it through your kids’ eyes. In 2014, actress Gwyneth Paltrow popularized conscious uncoupling as a byword for a positive, amicable divorce. As doctors Habib Sadeghi and Sherry Sami subsequently wrote on Paltrow’s website, “Children are imitators by nature … If we are to raise a more civilized generation, we must model those behaviors during the good and bad times in our relationships.”

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