necessary survival gear survival day

It is the hope of the IPC that the Survival Guide will become a useful initial resource for both prospective and current international postdocs in the United States, a resource that will evolve and adapt to reflect changes that affect the international postdoc community. The IPC welcomes comments, suggestions for improvements, and contributions to the Been There, Done That! section. Postdocs are invited to contact the International Officers.

A quick question on food storage – if I use mylar bags to store grains inside plastic buckets that are NOT denominated “food grade,” will this ruin my efforts? Must I only use “food grade” plastic buckets?

First you’ll need to find water. Water flows downhill, encourages vegetation, and collects in natural caches, be they ponds, lakes, rivers, springs, rock depressions, or even leaves. Unfortunately, most fresh water sources are not pure enough to drink from (as they used to be), so you’ll need to know how to purify water under most situations. Use any of these methods to collect clean, purified water:

Zombie Apocalypse : Siphon – in a disaster aftermath when fuel is no longer available through regular channels and cars are left abandoned on the road never to be used again, this is an option for garnering fuel for emergencies

Shelter is often your most critical survival priority in the wild, so make sure you always have a way to get out of the elements. The SOL Emergency Bivvy is a sleeping bag-style of sack made from tear-resistant polyethylene with a high visibility orange color to assist your rescue, if needed. This bivvy reflects back 90 percent of your body heat to keep you warm in extreme cold. The bivvy will even help you stay dry in the rain with sealed seam edges. It even comes with a handy stuff sack for compact storage. All this, and it’s only 3.8-ounces. You’d be crazy not to take this with you.

You will most likely have long, thin, metal rods or picks (used for tents) among your equipment. You can use this to form a makeshift grill but laying them across two logs. Use twigs and strings to keep them intact when necessary. Set this up over a fire and you can grill fish over the picks. You can use an aluminium cup to boil water over this setup as well.

Multi-tools are nice, but sometimes a single dedicated tool can be necessary, especially for harder jobs. This survival hatchet by our boy Bear Grylls is just such a tool. Whether you’re chopping trees to build yourself a shelter or just need something to fight off whatever monsters live in the woods, this will save your life.

The constant fear mongering after every shooting has people pushed to two extremes.  The first group cowers in manufactured fear at the feet of the government demanding more ink on paper to protect them. The second group gear up to protect themselves.

As anyone from a military background knows, intelligence is everything in emergencies. Without critical information such as weather conditions or roadblock locations, you may find yourself moving in the path of danger – or moving when you should be staying.

About Blog – James Burnette from the Survival Punk blog takes a rational, creative approach to self-reliance, applying a punk DIY ethic to survivalism without any of the fear mongering or “tinfoil hattery” found in some other areas of the survivalist movement.

About Blog – Ken Jorgustin’s survival blog invites you to learn survival and preparedness for life after a short term emergency, a disaster, or economic collapse. Ken covers a wide range of subjects, all of them in some way having relevance to preparedness and prepping – and the motivations for doing so.

This compass has it all and is very acurate compared with my other compasses I have in my boat and truck. The accessories tucked away within are really cool too. Very compact and a great addition to my survival gear kit.

The carbon sheets that you can get from saws have been proven to be able to withstand 22 calibre pistol bullets. With just a bit of duct tape and some proper attachment, you can create armour around your backpack and clothes that will protect you from shrapnel, arrows, and certain types of bullets. They’re bendable, snap proof, and pretty darn useful. There is a caveat though, Carbon steel will rust and is not stainless steel.

This is a really great post. Survivalife.com is very impressive and a market I think can still be penetrated if someone chose to. The site is designed to perfection, and as the first one to the punch, its become very successful.

Duct tape is one of the simplest pieces of the tool in my survival kit. It may seem a simple thing, but it has helped me in many tricky situations. I never leave for a hike or camp without it in my backpack.

Word has gotten around Amity. Casey Stoner is a prepper. Pretty much the whole island now knows that Casey has gathered up a mess of resources to use in just such a SHTF situation as they now face. All his … Continue reading →

How many of you have a flashlight on your keychain? I can’t tell you exactly how many times that I’ve used my own keychain flashlight (lots!). Having a flashlight at home is one thing, however most don’t have one on their person when they’re away from home. Sure, some of …

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