emergency survival tools hunting and survival gear

Survival Power: Portable water filters do not remove chemicals and so none are a complete solution to water. Outside of a city following a collapse local water sources may be contaminated with any number of chemicals as industrial run-off leeches into ground water, making this water unsafe to drink, even with a water filter. In a wilderness setting though, a Lifestraw should do just fine for you, and be a real life saver.

Personal Locator Beacons: These are smaller, affordable, reliable, and offer many new features. Companies like SPOT and DeLorme now offer products that post almost real-time tracks of adventurers far off the grid. The SPOT Gen3, for example, sells for as low as $150 and enables users to send simple, pre-programmed messages (all ok, send help, etc.) to friends and family or initiate rescue through a first-responder network.

Rawles is a strong proponent of Citizen Journalism. In April 2014, along with his son Robert, Rawles co-founded The Constitution First Amendment Press Association (CFAPA),[75] a private free press advocacy group that distributes press credentials to any literate adult U.S. Citizen, free of charge.[76][77]

Video requests are welcome – if you’d like to see a particular skill that I’ve not yet shown then feel free to leave a comment. Anything from fire-building, friction fire, fire from natural materials, tinders, charring, wild edibles, plant identification, fungi/slime mold identification, medicinal plants, wilderness first aid and wound treatment, camp cooking, water filtration and purification, natural shelter building, shelter building with synthetic materials, navigation without a compass, improvised compasses, primitive weaponry, primitive trapping, gear reviews, survival kits and gear requests.

About Blog – Survival Academy is an outdoorsmen’s journey to educated himself on how to lead, prepare and protect his family. Through the use of short stories and interactive entertainment, he provides a unique all-in-one resource for emergency preparedness information, survival tactics, escape & evasion training, the latest and greatest gear for men in their sixties who want to be self-reliant.

ax’s picks and shovels of different size. a truck of some sort. 12vdc fuel pump with long hose and power cable ( to pull fuel from underground tanks when no power. hand operated high pressure air pumps to fill your tanks. then there are tools to make items you need or repair.

Find safe food. Know that most healthy adults can survive up to three weeks without food unless it’s cold.[3] It’s better be hungry and healthy than ill. Make sure that you know food is safe before eating it. If there is anything that will lessen your ability to survive, it is being both lost and deathly ill. Starvation won’t be a big problem.

Look for moss on a tree trunk. Mosses usually grow as far away from sunlight and are often found on the north side of the trees and rocks. If the tree or rock is covered in moss, it will be thickest on the north side.

Then there’s the Lifestraw Portable Water Filter that comes in at just under $22; it’s not only a great portable water filter with a proven track record, it’s a Time Magazine Invention of the Year Winner on top of that. It’s been used by both backpackers and relief agencies in third world countries alike. It weighs only 2 ounces and is a perfect tool for extreme survival situations like wilderness survival as well as a tool for providing water safe to drink during an evacuation of a widespread disaster. It has a very simple construction with no moving parts — which means less chances of equipment breakdown.

Survival is your first priority, but don’t forget- you need to get rescued as well. Come up with an action plan in case a plane flies overhead or there are are search parties nearby. You’ve seen it in the movies – prepare a giant, easily visible fire pit out in the open or lay out stones in the pattern of HELP or S.O.S. You can also use any shiny, metallic object for reflection purposes.

• Bowline: This knot is extremely useful when you need to attach something to a rope via a loop, because the tighter you pull, the tighter the knot gets. After you make a loop, remember this: the rabbit comes out of the hole, in front of the tree, goes behind the tree, and back down its original hole.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *